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Neighborhood — South of Independencia, Centro Histórico, Oaxaca City, Oaxaca


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Restaurants  |  Sights  |  Markets  |  Shopping  |  Spanish Language Schools  |  Transportation  |  Tours  |  Sleeping  |  Listings

Moving south of Independencia and away from the Zócalo, the streets become less upscale, grittier, many lined with makeshift vendor stalls, seemingly chaotic, the businesses, shops, and markets catering less to tourists and more to the day-to-day needs of Oaxaqueños. Nothing exemplifies this more than the sprawling Mercado de Abastos, the city's premier market, where almost every product imaginable can be found, the trick being to find it lying somewhere among the maze of stalls several city blocks in size and the mixture of Spanish and Zapotecan and Mixtecan tongues, and all the while, across the street, a steady stream of buses, looking worse for the wear, comes roaring out of the second-class bus station, belching, filled with Oaxaqueños of all stripes, bound for villages and towns throughout the valley — this is Oaxaca. And anyone who considers himself or herself a serious and inquisitive traveler has to take the time to venture here, exploring its streets, markets, stalls, shops, and restaurants.

Restaurants



south of independencia eating notes go here...

NotesPickCheckMark.png Mercado 20 de Noviembre   Market, Oaxacan Restaurants, Mezcal     $-$$     (A)
O.K., folks, this place is it, the real deal – a whole city block of food stalls catering to locals and serving only authentic Oaxacan food, all for only a few pesos. For breakfast, head straight to the La Pereñita food stall and order a righteous cup of steaming champurrado, atole mixed with chocolate, which goes down nicely with a roll of pan de yema, egg-yolk bread. Outside, ringing the market, there are several well-stocked mezcal shops, making this a good place to pick up a bottle at a bargain. Be sure to sample the product before buying.

  • Two blocks south of the Zócalo between J. P. García & 20 de Noviembre;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.;  MX$10 - 100.  


NotesPickCheckMark.png La Red   Seafood Restaurant     $$-$$$     (M)
A local favorite, this marisquería inspires repeat visits with its low prices, tasty seafood, and welcoming vibe. There are two La Red restaurants in the city, one in the Centro Histórico, a block south of the Zócalo, the other in the Reforma neighborhood, about a thirty-minute walk north of the Zócalo.

  • Las Casas 101, corner Bustamante;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 12 noon - 8 p.m.;  Mex$80-150;  phone 951-514-6853.  


La Flor de Oaxaca   Oaxacan Restaurant     $$-$$$     (B)
In a quiet space, seemingly far removed from the raucous city streets surrounding it, this unpretentious little restaurant serves up faithful renditions of classic Oaxacan dishes at affordable prices, making it a fine place to retreat to after a long day of visiting the city’s many sights.

  • Armenta y López 311, south of Guerrero;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.,  Sun 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.;  MX$50 - 150;  Most major credit cards;  phone 951-516-5522.  


Tayu   Oaxacan Restaurant     $-$$     (C)
Great food, large portions, and low prices make this south of Independencia Oaxacan a favorite of budget travelers and locals alike.

  • 20 de Noviembre 416, south of Las Casas;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.,  closed Sun;  MX$30 - 60;  phone 951-516-5363.  


Café Alex   Oaxacan Restaurant     $-$$     (D)
Located three blocks west of the Zócalo, this south of Independencia Oaxacan dishes up large portions of traditional food at low prices. Anyone looking for a quiet meal, though, should steer clear of the interior courtyard — the squawking from the caged birds can be deafening.

  • Díaz Ordaz 218, cross street Trujano;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 7 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.,  Sun 7 a.m. - l p.m.;  MX$30 - 60;  phone 951-514-0715.  


La Coronita   Oaxacan Restaurant     $-$$     (E)
Yet another south of Independencia Oaxacan serving large portions of delicious food at low prices. For the best deals, stick with the breakfast specials and afternoon comida corrida.

  • Díaz Ordáz 208, south of Hidalgo in the Valle de Oaxaca hotel;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 7 a.m. - 11 p.m.;  MX$30 - 100;  phone 951-516-3707.  


Pastelería Quemen   Bakery     $     (A)
Good coffee, cakes, sweets, and a few meat filled pastries.

  • Independencia 902, between Armenta y López and Fiallo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 8 am - 9 pm;  Mex$10 - 30.  


Casa Elpidia   Oaxacan Restaurant     $-$$     (F)
Luring a mostly local crowd with its delicious home-style meals and low prices, this small, family-run restaurant has no a la carte menu, serving only breakfast specials in the morning and comida corrida in the afternoon.

  • Miguel Cabrera 413, one block south of Arista;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.;  MX$50 - 70;  phone 951-513-0126.  


Fidel Pan Integral   Bakery     $     (O)
Conveniently located a block west of the Zócalo, the Fidel Pan Integral bakery has a nice selection of croissants, sweet breads, and cookies. Everything is baked daily.


Sights



Notes go here...

Museo Textil de Oaxaca   Museum     (C)
Set in a nicely restored 18th-century colonial monastery, this small but delightful museum, recently opened in 2008, is dedicated to the study and preservation of the textiles of Oaxaca and México, exhibiting rotating collections of mostly hand-woven rugs and clothing from local, national, and even international weavers. There’s also a modest library with books about textiles and weaving, as well as a small retail shop selling quality hand-woven textiles, both open daily from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. and 4 - 8 p.m.

  • Hidalgo 917, corner of Fiallo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Tue - Mon 10 am - 8 pm,  closed Mon;  free;  phone 951-501-1104;  www.museotextildeoaxaca.org.mx;  info@museotextildeoaxaca.org.mx.  


NotesPickCheckMark.png Teatro Macedonio de Alcalá   Theater & Concert Hall, Neoclassical Architecture     (R)
Not yet reviewed.


Templo y Convento de San Augustín   Colonial Church     (F)

Templo y Convento de San Augustín — Oaxaca City, Oaxaca

Arriving in the city in 1580, the Augustinians erected their first church on this site in 1589. Earthquakes destroyed the original and subsequent churches, once again wrecking havoc, until the present church and its adjoining convent were completed in 1732.


Facing west, the church’s retablo façade overlooks a large, slightly sunken stone plaza. Like all retablo facades, this one is laid out in horizontal tiers, in this case four, arranged vertically, stacked one on top of the other, the bottom three tiers divided into three rectangular sections, the central sections filled with an arched main portal on the first tier, a splendid central relief of St. Augustine, the order’s founder, enclosed in an eared frame on the second tier, and an octagonal window opening into the choir loft on the third tier, deep shell niches with statues of saints filling the outer sections of the bottom three tiers, the niches bracketed in pairs of columns, a gable enclosed relief topping off the façade on the fourth tier.

But the real attraction lies inside — three gilded and heavily ornamented baroque retablos, assembled from statues, paintings, and pieces of original retablos from the colonial period.

  • Armenta y López, corner Guerrero, one block east of Zocalo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico.  


Templo de San Francisco   Colonial Church     (G)

Templo de San Francisco — Oaxaca City, Oaxaca

Late comers to the early evangelization efforts in the city, the Franciscans wasted no time in erecting a small, though poorly constructed, chapel and monastery on this site when they first arrived in 1592. Lack of resources hampered later attempts at constructing more permanent replacements for these buildings. Perseverance, however, eventually paid off, and a century later a new church and monastery were finally completed in the early 1690s.


And then, as fate would have it, the great earthquake of 1696 struck, soon followed by another powerful earthquake in 1697, both earthquakes heavily damaging the church and monastery, both buildings all but abandoned for the next eighty years, before construction on a new church and monastery, the current ones, finally got underway in 1776. Once undertaken, though, work progressed rapidly, and both buildings were completed a short four years later.

The church’s elegant façade — which is unique in the city — is still intact and has been completely restored. Slightly recessed and set beneath an arch, the façade is carved from gray limestone (not the green stone that is so ubiquitous in the city) and sculpted in the Churrigueresque style that was in vogue at the time. The interior of the church, however, hasn't fared so well, with most of its furnishings and ornamentation having been stripped out over the centuries, the once splendid interior denuded, left barren.

  • Calle del Dr. Pardo, between Bustamante & Armenta y López;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico.  


Templo de la Defensa   Colonial Church     (K)
Construction of the first church on this site began in 1786 and was completed in 1792. A short three years later, in 1795, an earthquake destroyed it. Work on the present church got underway soon after and was completed in 1798. The church’s east-facing main and north-facing side facades are both classic retablo baroque, their layout elegant, though simple of design. The real treat, however, awaits inside — a gilded Churrigueresque main retablo, probably the original, fitted to the apse, its top rising up and rounded to the low vaulted ceiling. There’s also another, smaller gilded Churriguresque retablo set in a large niche in the south wall of the nave.

  • corner Arteaga & Fiallo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico.  


Templo y Convento de San Juan de Dios   Colonial Church     (B)
The first Catholic church ever built in the city, a makeshift structure of mud-brick walls and straw roof, was erected on this site in 1521. A short time later, a new and what was thought to be permanent church, constructed of brick walls and tile roof, was built to replace it. The brick church stood for over a hundred years until an earthquake in 1662 leveled it. Construction on a new church, along with a monastery and a hospital, got underway in 1699 and was completed a short four years later, in 1703. This one survived for over a hundred and fifty years, a fire destroying it in 1864.

Construction on the present church began a few years later and was completed in 1896. Though unique among churches in the city for its trapezoid-shaped wooden roof, the church is best known for its large 17th-century oil paintings, which line the walls and the angled lengths of the ceiling, depicting scenes from the life of Christ and famous events in the religious life of Oaxaca.

Located a couple of blocks south of the Zócalo, the area around the church is commercial, gritty, the streets lined with vendor stalls and storefronts, including the Mercado Benito Juárez to the north, an entire block of vendor stalls selling just about any item imaginable, and the Mercado 20 de Noviembre to the southeast, with dozens of food stalls serving traditional Oaxacan cuisine.

  • 20 de Noviembre, corner Aldama;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico.  


Templo y Convento de Nuestra Señora de la Merced   Colonial Church     (A)

Templo y Convento de Nuestra Señora de la Merced — Oaxaca City, Oaxaca

Mercedarian monks traveling between México City and their missions in Guatemala established a way station here in 1598. It took over a hundred years, but in the early 17 century, the order finally built their first church on this site. Soon after it was completed, though, earthquakes destroyed it. Then, after several more decades of work, the present church was finally completed in 1690.


Facing west, the church overlooks a large, shady plaza, bordered on the north by busy Independencia Avenue. Mostly shrouded in trees, its retablo façade is elegant, though simple of design, lacking the excessive ornamentation of many of the Dominican facades. As with all retablo façades, it is laid out in tiers, in this case four, stacked one on top of the other, each tier a single section, an arched portal on the first tier, a single statue set in a shell niche on the second tier, an oval choir window on the third tier, and another single statue lodged in a shell niche on the fourth tier.

Beyond the simple exterior lies an unexpectedly bright and ornate interior, recently painted. The nave is covered by a series of high domes and lined with lateral arches, buried deep within the aches neoclassical altarpieces filled with colonial paintings and statues, the whole interior aglow with natural light from windows high in the nave and crossing.

  • Corner of Independencia & Manuel Doblado;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico.  


Templo y Convento de los Siete Príncipes   Colonial Church     (D)
Although this location was established as a Catholic religious site in 1730, work on the church and the convent of the Siete Principes, dedicated to the seven archangels, didn’t get started until 1755, the church completed in 1764, the adjoining convent in 1782.

The exterior of the church is noteworthy for its arcaded portico, or narthex, covering the main portal, something of an oddity in the city. (The only other narthex can be found covering the main portal to the Carmen Alto church.) On the inside, the church has been completely renovated, stripped of its colonial furnishings and ornamentation, save the seven colonial-era statues of the seven archangels adorning the early 20th-century neoclassical main retablo.

As for the convent, it’s been converted into a cultural center, the Casa de la Cultura Oaxaqueña, conducting classes, workshops, exhibits, and events focusing on all things artistic and cultural, its classrooms, studios, and galleries lining the arched corridors of the ex-convent’s two cloisters, the center alive with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers. The center publishes, in Spanish, a schedule of activities, widely available in restaurants, cafés, and bookstores in the Centro.

  • González Ortega, corner Colón;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico.  


Markets



South of Independencia Neighborhood Market notes go here...

NotesPickCheckMark.png Mercado de Abastos   Market     (A)
The massive Abastos market, a maze of stalls several city blocks in size, offers a full range of Oaxacan goods, as well as practically any other product imaginable. Indeed, imagine it and there's probably a stall selling it. Fridays and Saturdays are the main shopping days when vendors, many of different indigenous groups, come from all over the valley and other regions of the state to sell their foodstuffs, wares, and handicrafts. With this mix of peoples present, it's normal to hear buyers and sellers haggling in languages other than Spanish, usually Zapotecan and Mixtecan. For first-time visitors the market appears to be utter chaos. Actually, though, it's well ordered, with each type of product grouped into its own area. And sure, it's a bargain hunters paradise, but it's also a great place to experience the noises, the grime, the heat, the smells, the tastes, the colors that are Oaxaca.

  • West of Periférico Sur and south of De La Casas;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  open daily.  


NotesPickCheckMark.png Mercado 20 de Noviembre   Market, Oaxacan Restaurants, Mezcal     $-$$     (A)
O.K., folks, this place is it, the real deal – a whole city block of food stalls catering to locals and serving only authentic Oaxacan food, all for only a few pesos. For breakfast, head straight to the La Pereñita food stall and order a righteous cup of steaming champurrado, atole mixed with chocolate, which goes down nicely with a roll of pan de yema, egg-yolk bread. Outside, ringing the market, there are several well-stocked mezcal shops, making this a good place to pick up a bottle at a bargain. Be sure to sample the product before buying.

  • Two blocks south of the Zócalo between J. P. García & 20 de Noviembre;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.;  MX$10 - 100.  


NotesPickCheckMark.png El Pochote Market   Market, Organic     $-$$     (P)
With two locations in town, El Pochote Market is the best place in the city to buy fresh organic produce directly from local growers. In addition to produce, a lot of the vendors sell packaged organic products, including even mezcal. One of the Pochotes materializes every Friday and Saturday at 8:30 in the morning in the courtyard of the Templo de Santo Tomás, in the Barrio de Xochimilco, and runs until around 3:30 in the afternoon, while the other other one, which runs daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. except for Sundays, operates out of a brick-and-mortar building four blocks southeast of the Zócalo. Be sure to bring along a sturdy tote bag for your spoils.

  • Rayon 411, between Melchor Ocampo and Xicoténcatl, four blocks southeast of Zócalo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.,  Closed Sun.  


Mercado Benito Juárez   Market     (C)
Located one block south of the Zócalo, the one-block square Mercado Benito Juárez was the City's original market. However, today, because of that proximity, it's the most touristy of the major markets, so it's important to be discerning when shopping here because the stuff sold is a mix of trash and treasure. Still, its worth a visit and deals can be found here among a variety of goods: fresh produce, seafood, meats, regional pottery and other traditional crafts, contemporary clothes and shoes, and leather goods.

  • One block south of the Zócalo between 20 de Noviembre and Flores Magón;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  daily 9 am - 9 pm.  


Mercado de Artesanías   Arts & Crafts, Market     (D)
This large clean indoor crafts market was setup by the city so that street vendors would have a permanent place to sell their handicrafts. Unfortunately for both sellers and shoppers it's outside of the main tourist haunts immediately around the Zócalo and north of Independencia, so an effort must be made to get here to shop and business appears to be slow because of it. Still, it's a pleasant place to shop and there are quality handicrafts to be found here (though poor quality as well) so it's worth the 10 minute walk from the Zócalo. The stalls here feature mostly ropa típica: huipiles, camisas, blusas, and pantalones and some other traditional crafts like: alebrijes, tinwork, and tapetes. Don't be afraid to haggle over price - it's expected.

  • Corner of J.P. García & Zaragoza;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  daily.  


Shopping



notes, if any, go here...


Spanish Language Schools



notes, if any, go here...

Centro de Idiomas   Spanish Language School     (F)
The Centro de Idiomas (Language Center) offers six levels of general Spanish language classes — from beginner to advanced — all conversation-based, along with an extensive selection of Latin American Studies courses in art, writing, literature, history, politics, and economics. Associated with the University of Oaxaca Benito Juárez, the Center is housed off the main campus in a 1960s government-style school building five blocks south of the Zócalo Because of their affiliation with the University, courses taken here are good candidates for transfer towards university credit. Be sure to check with your university beforehand. Extracurricular activities and workshops include intercambio, Oaxacan folk art and cooking, and day trips. Homestays, posadas, and studio apartments are available.

  • Burgoa, east of Bustamante;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  10/20 hrs wk,  USD$70/140 wk, instruction material cost not included, no registration fee;  phone 951-514-0049;  espanol-idiomas.uabjo.mx;  espanol@fioaxaca.com.mx.  


Español Interactivo   Spanish Language School     (G)
Offers conversation-based general Spanish language courses and a full curriculum in Spanish of specialized courses in children's Spanish, health care, law enforcement, education, social work, and tourism. Extracurricular activities and workshops include: day trips, Oaxacan cooking and weaving, day trips, playing the marimba, film, and salsa, cumbia and merengue dance. Homestays, apartments, and hotels are available.

  • Armenta y López 311-B, south of Guerrero;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  15/20/25/30/40 hrs wk,  USD$115/150/195/230/300 wk,  includes instruction material,  no registration fee;  phone 951-514-6062;  www.studyspanishinoaxaca.com;  info@studyspanishinoaxaca.com.  


Transportation



Notes go here...

Second-class Bus Station   Bus Station     (B)
Most second-class bus companies operate out of this station. The exceptions are the Sur and AU, which operate out of the Sur Bus Station about 1/3 mile (500m) to the south on Periférico.

  • North side of Juárez Maza, half-block west of Periférico;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  open daily.  


Sur Bus Station   Bus Station     (N)
The second-class bus companies Sur and AU operate out of these two stations, not the main second-class bus station.

  • 1) Periférico 1014, south of Mercado de Abastos; 2) corner Periférico and Victoria, across street from Mercado de Abastos;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  daily;  phone 951-514-4486.  


Autoexprés de Turismo y Pasaje Atlántida   Van     (X)
Nine express air-conditioned passenger vans depart daily for Pochutla (6 hrs), along winding Highway 175 through the rugged Sierra Madre del Sur. Departure times: 4:30, 7:00, 9:00, 11:00, 13:00, 15:00, 17:30, 20:30, 23:30. From Pochutla colectivos leave every few minutes for the Pacific coast fishing village of Puerto Ángel and nearby beach towns of Zipolite, San Augustinillo, and Mazunte (15-30 minutes).

  • Armenta y López 621, corner La Noria;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 4:30 am - 11:30 pm,  Sun 7 am - 11:30 pm;  Mex$120;  phone 951-514-7077951-514-1346;  cell 044-951-128-4319.  


Eclipse 70   Van     (Y)
Thirteen express air-conditioned passenger vans depart daily for Pochutla (6 hrs), along winding Highway 175 through the rugged Sierra Madre del Sur. Departure times: 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12:30, 14:00, 15:30, 17:00, 18:30, 20:00, 21:30, 23:15. From Pochutla colectivos leave every few minutes for the Pacific coast fishing village of Puerto Ángel and nearby beach towns of Zipolite, San Augustinillo, and Mazunte (15-30 minutes).

  • Bustamante 622, corner Xochitl;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Daily 5 am - 11:15 pm;  Mex$120;  phone 951-516-1068.  


Excelencia   Van     (M)
Express air-conditioned passenger vans depart daily every 30 minutes for the northwest Mixteca region destinations of Nochixtlan, Yolomecatl, Huajuapun, Teposcolula, Juxtlahuaca, Tlaxiaco, and Putla.

  • Díaz Ordaz 305, south of Trujano;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  phone 951-516-3578.  


Colectivos, Abastos   Colectivos     (W)
Depart continuously for destinations in the valleys to the east and the south. For destinations to the valley in the north, see Colectivos, North (X).

  • West of Periférico Sur, between Mercaderes and Galeana, at the southeast corner of the Mercado Abastos;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  daily.  


Colectivos, North   Colectivos     (V)
Depart continuously for destinations in the valley to the north. For destinations to the valleys in the east and the south, see Colectivos, Abastos (W).

  • West of Periférico Sur, north of Valerio Trujano, north of main second-class bus station;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  daily.  


Tours



Ecoturixtlán   Outdoor Adventure Tours     (G)
Ecotourist cooperative run by the village of Ixtlan de Juarez in the Sierra Norte mountains. Activities and amenities include hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding along pine- and oak-forested trails; cabins with fireplaces; and a restaurant that serves traditional Oaxacan food. In Ixtlan de Juarez the office is at Av. 16 de Septiembre, corner of Revolución in front of city hall, 951-553-6075.


Viajes Turisticos Mitla   Tours     (L)
Runs tours to many valley sites. Main office is at Hotel Rivera del Angel; satellite office at the Hostal Santa Rosa (Trujano 201, corner 20 de Noviembre, one block west of the Zócalo, 951-514-7800 or 951-514-7806). Notable is their inexpensive shuttle to Monte Albán, with multiple daily departures from the Hostal Santa Rosa, call 951-516-6175 or drop by to make reservation.

  • Mina 518, corner Mier y Terán;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  phone 951-514-3152.  


Bicicletas Pedro Martinez   Outdoor Adventure Tours, Bike Rental     (O)
Runs half- and full-day guided bike tours for all levels in the city and the valleys and multi-day trips to the sierras and the Pacific coast. Also runs guided hikes and mixed tours of hiking and biking. Costs vary, starting at Mex$430 for city bike tours and topping off at Mex$4250 (all inclusive) for the four-day trip to Puerto Escondido. All guided trips have a two person minimum. Bike rentals are available for Mex$120 per day, includes helmet, lock, tools, and map. The shop also sells new and used bikes, as well as a full line of accessories.


Sleeping


Hotels




notes, if any, go here...

Not yet reviewed.

Listings



notes, if any, go here...

Casa de la Cultura Oaxaqueña   Cultural Center, Movies     (C)
Housed in a lovingly restored late 18th century ex-convent on the southeastern edge of the Centro Histórico, the Center -- dedicated to preservation and promulgation of Oaxaca's cultural heritage -- has almost daily cultural events like art and photography exhibits, dance, movement and performance art, concerts, film screenings, plays, etc... Look for their fliers around town at many cafés and other public places with monthly schedules (Spanish only) of events. A lot of these events are free and -- although tourists are welcome -- they're put on for the benefit of locals. Next door to the Templo y Convento de los Siete Príncipes — Oaxaca City, Oaxaca.


AREEM   Shipping     (D)
Artesanias Envios Empaques Mensajeria (AREEM) specializes in packing and shipping delicate art objects abroad. Over time, they've built up a solid list of clients, mainly US galleries, museums, and commercial importers. Since they're experts at packing anything fragile and use only reputable shippers such as UPS, Fedex, and DHL, they're probably the safest bet for shipping anything of value home.

  • Independencia 500, half-block west of the Alameda de Leon;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  phone 951-514-0337;  fax 951-516-8353;  www.areem.biz;  info@areem.biz.  


La Gran Montaña   Outdoor Gear     (E)
Small shop stacked to the ceiling with mostly rock and mountain climbing gear, but also a respectable selection of basic outdoor adventure gear such as tents, stoves, hiking boots, gore-tex outer shells, etc...

  • Hidalgo 1111, half-block east of Ocampo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  phone 951-516-1392;  www.lagranmontana.com;  tienda@lagranmontana.com,  wichodiaz@hotmail.com.  


Oaxakolor, 20 de Noviembre   Camera Shop     (F)
One of two Oaxakolor camera shops in the Centro. This one is possibly the best-stocked camera shop in town.

  • 20 de Noviembre 108, half-block north of Hidalgo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 9 am - 9 pm,  closed Sun;  phone 951-516-3487.  


Foto Mercado   Camera Shop     (G)

  • 415 Hidalgo, half-block west of 20 de Noviembre;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 9 am - 8 pm,  closed Sun.  


Foto Figueroa   Camera Shop     (H)

  • Hidalgo 516, just west of 20 de Noviembre;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 9 am - 8 pm,  closed Sun;  phone 951-516-3766.  


Express Kolor   Camera Shop     (J)

  • 20 de Noviembre 225, half-block north of Hidalgo;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 9 am - 8 pm,  closed Sun;  phone 951-516-1492.  


Azteca Lavanderia   Laundromat     (K)

  • Hidalgo 404, just east of Díaz Ordaz;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Sat 8 am - 8 pm,  Sun 10 am - 2 pm;  phone 951-514-7951.  


Super Lavanderia   Laundromat     (L)

  • Corner Hidalgo and García;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon – Fri 9 am – 2 pm & 5 - 8 pm,  Sat 9 am – 2 pm;  phone 951-514-1181.  


Dr. Angel Gómez Reyes   Dentist     (V)
Speaks English.

  • Bustamante 312-A, south of Aldama;  South of Independencia, Centro Histórico;  Mon - Fri 10 am - 2 pm,  4 - 7 pm;  phone 951-516-4959;  www.oaxacadental.com;  gomezagr@hotmail.com.  


Farmacias del Ahorro, Colón   Pharmacy     (U)
After hours, call (951) 515-5000 for free 24 hour home delivery.


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